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Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education

Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education
Thu Apr 25

Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education

Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education
Thu Apr 25

Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education

Theme: Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education

Time:
8:00 am - 5:00 pm CT

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Integration of Migrant Students and Use of Emerging Technologies in Education

As an island just 7 miles off the coast of Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago has been deeply affected by the country’s growing refugee crisis. Trinidad and Tobago is home to around 40,000 Venezuelan refugees, a large number considering the country’s population of only 1.3 million. Of that number, fewer than 10,000 have received government approval to legally work and reside in the country, but all refugee and migrant children are prohibited from enrolling in Trinidad and Tobago’s school system. The government of Trinidad and Tobago (GoTT) announced in July 2023 that it would change its policy and allow refugee and migrant children to attend school starting in the fall. This announcement followed significant advocacy from Embassy Port of Spain and other members of the diplomatic corps, international organizations, and senior leadership in Washington to include Secretary Blinken. The change represented a victory for the empowerment of marginalized communities and rights of children in Trinidad and Tobago. However, the school year started in September, yet no Venezuelan students have begun classes. Bureaucratic hurdles, internal GoTT resistance, unclear registration processes, and other sources of uncertainty have prevented GoTT, in particular the Ministries of Education and National Security, from enrolling students. Likewise, dated technology, particularly concerning administrative systems, have made managing t3he process tedious, complicated, and prone to error. As such, the embassy has engaged MoE, MNS, and relevant civil society stakeholders regarding an IVLP on-demand focused on integrating migrant children and incorporating technology into the education system, among other issues. They responded very positively and are excited about the idea. In our ideal project, representatives of Ministry of Education, Ministry of National Security, and civil society will explore U.S. models for integrating refugees, migrants, and ESL students into school systems and examine how emerging technologies could be used to enroll, assess, track, and develop effective interventions for Venezuelan and other students in Trinidad and Tobago. Policymakers and educators will also gain insight into how integration and educating all students benefits societies, in particular from the perspectives of economic growth and crime prevention. Analyzing these benefits is important, as the GoTT’s top priority is fighting crime and reducing the influence of gangs on TT’s youth. Policymakers will also review vocational education programs in the U.S. and study how government and the private sector collaborate to ensure that training serves both students and businesses. An increased investment in vocational programs would provide many low-income and at-risk students with employment opportunities.

Countries visiting: Trinidad and Tobago

  • About the event

    As an island just 7 miles off the coast of Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago has been deeply affected by the country’s growing refugee crisis. Trinidad and Tobago is home to around 40,000 Venezuelan refugees, a large number considering the country’s population of only 1.3 million. Of that number, fewer than 10,000 have received government approval to legally work and reside in the country, but all refugee and migrant children are prohibited from enrolling in Trinidad and Tobago’s school system. The government of Trinidad and Tobago (GoTT) announced in July 2023 that it would change its policy and allow refugee and migrant children to attend school starting in the fall. This announcement followed significant advocacy from Embassy Port of Spain and other members of the diplomatic corps, international organizations, and senior leadership in Washington to include Secretary Blinken. The change represented a victory for the empowerment of marginalized communities and rights of children in Trinidad and Tobago. However, the school year started in September, yet no Venezuelan students have begun classes. Bureaucratic hurdles, internal GoTT resistance, unclear registration processes, and other sources of uncertainty have prevented GoTT, in particular the Ministries of Education and National Security, from enrolling students. Likewise, dated technology, particularly concerning administrative systems, have made managing t3he process tedious, complicated, and prone to error. As such, the embassy has engaged MoE, MNS, and relevant civil society stakeholders regarding an IVLP on-demand focused on integrating migrant children and incorporating technology into the education system, among other issues. They responded very positively and are excited about the idea. In our ideal project, representatives of Ministry of Education, Ministry of National Security, and civil society will explore U.S. models for integrating refugees, migrants, and ESL students into school systems and examine how emerging technologies could be used to enroll, assess, track, and develop effective interventions for Venezuelan and other students in Trinidad and Tobago. Policymakers and educators will also gain insight into how integration and educating all students benefits societies, in particular from the perspectives of economic growth and crime prevention. Analyzing these benefits is important, as the GoTT’s top priority is fighting crime and reducing the influence of gangs on TT’s youth. Policymakers will also review vocational education programs in the U.S. and study how government and the private sector collaborate to ensure that training serves both students and businesses. An increased investment in vocational programs would provide many low-income and at-risk students with employment opportunities.

    Countries visiting: Trinidad and Tobago